Tag: Virgin Mary

What You Should Know About the Immaculate Heart of Mary

What You Should Know About the Immaculate Heart of Mary

One of the most common Marian devotions in the Catholic Church today is that of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, mostly honored alongside the Sacred Heart of Jesus. This devotion has its roots in the Scripture, which makes frequent mention of Mary’s contemplative heart, for example in Luke 2:19:

“But Mary exalted all these words and thought about them in her heart.”

According to Catholic doctrine, Mary is the Immaculate Conception; that is, in the getting ready for the Incarnation of the Second Person of the Holy Trinity in her womb, Mary was conceived without the corruption of original sin, and was preserved from committing any actual sins throughout the course of her life through the infinite merits of her Son, Jesus Christ. She was virginal not only of the soul, but also of the body, both before and after giving birth to Our Lord.

Our Lady was created literally “Full of Grace” as the Archangel Gabriel declared at the Annunciation, meaning that her soul was literally adorned with all of the virtues at the moment of her conception, as well as all the gifts and fruits of the Holy Spirit.

This fullness of grace is said to stem out from the center of her being—her heart—understood both physically and spiritually. It is Mary’s heart, in its unspoiled created perfection, that is the source and wellspring of her purity . . . therefore her heart is called Immaculate.

Our Lord took His sacred humanity from the flesh and blood of his Blessed Mother; Christ’s heart is taken from her heart. At Calvary, the perfect hearts of Jesus and Mary were joined for the salvation of mankind. And this is why the Two Hearts are exalted together.

While the Sacred Heart of Jesus is the source of Christ’s burning love for humanity, and is largely spurned by the indifference of mankind towards Him, the Immaculate Heart of Mary is the source of Our Lady’s burning love for God and her wish to bring souls to her Son, and is so often outraged by the offenses of mankind committed against her love.

Over the centuries, as the saints and theologians reflected on what it means for Our Lady to have pondered and treasured the sacred events from the life of Jesus in her heart, as attested in Scripture, Mary’s heart began to be recognized as something to be emulated in daily routine.

Devotion to Mary’s holy heart then developed, in much the same way as it did for the Sacred Heart, which was physically pierced by the lance on the Cross to give Eternal Life to men. So also does Mary’s heart, which was also pierced (as prophesied by Simeon) in union with her Son, give life—that is, grace—to the Christian soul.

Beginning in the Middle Ages, this devotion to Our Lady’s purity of heart began to flower, culminating in St. John Eudes actively making known the devotion in the 17th century alongside that of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. He also worked to have a feast established for the Immaculate Heart of Mary, starting in his native France.

After the 1830 apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Paris, which gave rise to the Miraculous Medal, efforts were renewed to have a devotion to the Immaculate Heart instituted as a feast for the universal Church. In this Marian apparition, Our Lady showed St. Catherine Laboure an image of a medal to be struck which would obtain many graces for those who wore it faithfully, mostly the grace of conversion for sinners.

On the front of the medal was an image of Our Lady encircled with the words, O Mary, Conceived Without Sin, Pray for Us Who Have Recourse to Thee, confirming the dogma of her Immaculate Conception. One the reverse was an image of the Cross of Christ surmounted by the letter “M”, and below it, the symbols of Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart of Mary side-by-side, thus confirming the devotion to her holy heart.

The spreading popularity of the Miraculous Medal soon gave rise to a Marian confraternity based on her Immaculate Heart and her authority to convert sinners. The Notre-Dame-des-Victoires of the Archconfraternity of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Refuge of Sinners was established in Paris in 1836 and quickly spread all over the world, with many graces, especially the repentance of sinners, obtained as a result. Then, in 1855, the feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary (or Most Pure Heart of Mary) was confirmed by the Vatican, however, without establishing it for the universal Church.

Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary rose to a new level after the apparitions of Our Lady of Fatima. In her visitations to Lucia, Jacinta, and Francisco, Our Lady revealed a vision of her Immaculate Heart encircled with thorns which showed the many sins committed against her. At Fatima, Our Lady asked for Russia to be consecrated to her Immaculate Heart in order to prevent many problems from occurring in the Church and throughout the world.

Lucia describes the vision:

“As Our Lady spoke these last words, she opened her hands and for the second time, she communicated to us the rays of that same immense light. We saw ourselves in this light, as it were, immersed in God. … In front of the palm of Our Lady’s right hand was a heart encircled by thorns which pierced it. We understood that this was the Immaculate Heart of Mary, outraged by the sins of humanity, and searching reparation.”

At Fatima, Our Lady also revealed her request for the faithful to make Communions of Reparation to her Immaculate Heart on five consecutive first Saturdays of the month. Therefore devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary is closely related with acts of reparation for sins in order to get the salvation of sinners. When Sr. Lucia later inquired from Our Lord why he would not convert Russia without having it consecrated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Our Lord said,

”Because I want My whole Church to affirm that Consecration as a triumph of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, so that it may extend its cult later on, and put the Devotion to My Mother’s Immaculate Heart beside the Devotion to My Sacred Heart.”

After the apparitions of Our Lady of Fatima, the feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary was instituted for the universal Church by Pope Pius XII in 1944. The feast was first celebrated on August 22nd, the octave day of the Solemnity of the Assumption. It was later changed to the Saturday adhering the feast of the Sacred Heart so that the Two Hearts would appear side-by-side, Friday and Saturday, on the liturgical calendar. August 22nd was then made the feast of the Queenship of the Blessed Virgin Mary, connecting the Assumption to her reign in heaven (the 4th and 5th Glorious Mysteries of the Holy Rosary).

Traditionally, the Church admonishes special devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary during the entire month of August.

Today, the feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary remains on the level of a memorial. Hopefully, as the requests of Our Lady of Fatima are more widely heeded, the Immaculate Heart of Mary will enjoy a reserved place in the heart of each and every Catholic around the world.

7 Things You Wish To Know About The Immaculate Conception

7 Things You Wish To Know About The Immaculate Conception

8th December is the feast of the Immaculate Conception. It celebrates a crucial point of Catholic teaching.

These are 7 things you need to know about the teaching and the way the feast of Immaculate Conception is been celebrated.

What is the Immaculate Conception?

The Catechism of the Catholic Church explains it thus:

490 To become the mother of the Saviour, Mary “was enriched by God with gifts appropriate to such a role.” The angel Gabriel at the moment of the annunciation salutes her as “full of grace”. In fact, in order for Mary to be able to give the free assent of her faith to the announcement of her vocation, it was essential that she be wholly borne by God’s grace.

491 Through the centuries the Church has become ever more aware that Mary, “full of grace” through God, was redeemed from the time of her conception. That is what the dogma of the Immaculate Conception confesses, as Pope Pius IX proclaimed in 1854:

The most Blessed Virgin Mary was, from the first moment of her conception, by a singular grace and privilege of almighty God and by virtue of the merits of Jesus Christ, Saviour of the human race, preserved immune from all stain of original sin

Who does the Immaculate Conception refer to?

There’s a well-known idea that it refers to Jesus’ conception by the Virgin Mary.

It doesn’t.

Instead, it refers to the special way in which the Virgin Mary herself was conceived.

This conception was not virginal. (That is, she had a human father as well as a human mother.) But it was special and unique in another way. . .

Does this mean Mary didn’t need Jesus to die on the Cross for her?

No. What we’ve already quoted states that Mary was immaculately conceived as part of her being “full of grace” and thus “redeemed from the moment of her conception” by “a singular grace and right of almighty God and by virtue of the merits of Jesus Christ, Saviour of the human race.”

The Catechism goes on to state:

492 The “splendor of completely unique in holiness” by which Mary is “blessed from the first instant of her conception” comes wholly from Christ: she is “redeemed, in a more exalted fashion, by reason of the merits of her Son”. The Father blessed Mary more than any other created person “in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places” and select her “in Christ before the basics of the world, to be holy and without sin before him in love”.

508 From among the descendants of Eve, God chose the Virgin Mary to be the mother of his Son. “Full of grace”, Mary is “the most excellent fruit of redemption” (SC 103): from the first instant of her conception, she was totally preserved from the stain of original sin and she stayed pure from all personal sin in her entire life.

How does this make Mary a parallel of Eve?

Adam and Eve were both created immaculate–without original sin or its stain. They fell from grace, and through them, mankind was bound to sin.

Christ and Mary were also conceived immaculate. They stayed faithful, and by them, mankind was redeemed from sin.

Christ is thus the New Adam, and Mary the New Eve.

The Catechism notes:

494 . . . As St., Irenaeus says, “Being obedient she became the cause of salvation for herself and for the whole human race.” Hence not a few of the early Fathers gladly assert. .: “The knot of Eve’s disobedience was untied by Mary’s obedience: what the virgin Eve bound through her disbelief, Mary loosened by her faith.” Comparing her with Eve, they call Mary “the Mother of the living” and frequently claim: “Death through Eve, life through Mary.”

How does this make Mary an icon of our own destiny?

Those who die in God’s friendship and thus go to heaven will be freed from all sin and stain of sin. We will thus all be rendered “immaculate” (Latin, immaculatus = “stainless”) if we remain faithful to God.

Even in this life, God makes us pure and disciplines us in holiness and, if we die in his friendship but imperfectly purified, he will cleanse us in purgatory and render us immaculate.

By giving Mary this grace from the first moment of her conception, God revealed us an image of our own destiny. He reveals to us that this is possible for humans through his grace.

John Paul II noted:

In pondering this mystery in a Marian perspective, we can say that “Mary, at the side of her Son, is the most perfect image of freedom and of the freedom of humanity and of the universe. It is to her as Mother and Model that the Church must look in order to understand in its completeness the meaning of her own mission” (Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Libertatis conscientia, 22 March 1986, n. 97; cf. Redemptoris Mater, n. 37).

Let us focus our gaze, then, on Mary, the icon of the pilgrim Church in the wilderness of history but on her way to the glorious destination of the heavenly Jerusalem, where she [the Church] will shine as the Bride of the Lamb, Christ the Lord.

How do we celebrate the Immaculate Conception?

In the Latin custom of the Catholic Church, December 8th is the solemnity of the Immaculate Conception. In the United States and in a number of other countries, it is a holy day of duty.

Was it important for God to make Mary immaculate at her conception so that she could be Jesus’ mother?

No. The Church only speaks of the Immaculate Conception as something that was “fitting,” something that made Mary a “fit habitation” (i.e., suitable dwelling) for the Son of God, not something that was important. Thus in preparing to define the dogma, Pope Pius IX stated:

And consequently they [the Church Fathers] agreed that the Blessed Virgin was, through grace, completely free from every stain of sin, and from all corruption of body, soul and mind; that she was constantly united with God and joined to him by an eternal covenant; that she was never in darkness but always in light; and that, therefore, she was entirely a fit habitation for Christ, not because of the state of her body, but because of her original grace. . . .

For it was certainly not fitting that this vessel of election should be wounded by the common injuries, since she, differing so much from the others, had only nature in common with them, not sin. In fact, it was quite fitting that, as the Only-Begotten has a Father in heaven, whom the Seraphim extol as thrice holy, so he should have a Mother on earth who would never be without the splendor of holiness

Was Mary a virgin when she gave birth?

Was Mary a virgin when she gave birth?

Image result for the virginity of mary

The Virginity of Mary

The virgin birth of Jesus is the belief that Jesus was conceived in the womb of his mother Mary. This was through the Holy Spirit without the agency of a human father and born while Mary was still a virgin. The New Testament references are

  • Matthew 1:18-25 and
  • Luke 1:26-38;

it is not expressly mentioned elsewhere in the Christian scriptures. The modern scholarly consensus is that the doctrine of the virgin birth rests on a very slim historical foundation. This is one of the dogma of Mary in the Catholic Church.

How is the Virgin of Mary accepted?

The virgin birth was universally accepted in the Christian church and, except for some minor sects, was not seriously challenged until the 18th century.

New Testament references

The story of Jesus’ miraculous conception by the Holy Spirit is found only in the Gospel of Matthew and the Gospel of Luke.

Matthew

18 Now the birth of Jesus the Messiah took place in this way. When his mother Mary had been engaged to Joseph, but before they lived together, she was found to be with child from the Holy Spirit. 19 Her husband Joseph, being a righteous man and unwilling to expose her to public disgrace, planned to dismiss her quietly. 20 But just when he had resolved to do this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary as your wife, for the child conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. 21 She will bear a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.” 22 All this took place to fulfill what had been spoken by the Lord through the prophet:

23 “Look, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son,
and they shall name him Emmanuel,”

which means, “God is with us.” 24 When Joseph awoke from sleep, he did as the angel of the Lord commanded him; he took her as his wife, 25 but had no marital relations with her until she had borne a son; and he named him Jesus

Luke

26 In the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent by God to a town in Galilee called Nazareth, 27 to a virgin engaged to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David. The virgin’s name was Mary. 28 And he came to her and said, “Greetings, favored one! The Lord is with you.” 29 But she was much perplexed by his words and pondered what sort of greeting this might be. 30 The angel said to her, “Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found favor with God. 31 And now, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you will name him Jesus. 32 He will be great, and will be called the Son of the Most High, and the Lord God will give to him the throne of his ancestor David. 33 He will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of his kingdom there will be no end.” 34 Mary said to the angel, “How can this be, since I am a virgin?” 35 The angel said to her, “The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; therefore the child to be born will be holy; he will be called Son of God. 36 And now, your relative Elizabeth in her old age has also conceived a son; and this is the sixth month for her who was said to be barren. 37 For nothing will be impossible with God.” 38 Then Mary said, “Here am I, the servant of the Lord; let it be with me according to your word.” Then the angel departed from her.[7]

How old was Mary when she gave birth to baby Jesus?

How old was Mary when she gave birth to baby Jesus?

 

Luke 1 : 26-35 

…..the  angel Gabriel was sent from God to a town of Galilee called Nazareth,  to a virgin betrothed to a man named Joseph, of the house of David, and  the virgin’s name was Mary. 
And coming to her, he said, “Hail, favoured one! The Lord is with you.”
But she was greatly troubled at what was said and pondered what sort of greeting this might be. 
Then  the angel said to her, “Do not be afraid, Mary, for you have found  favour with God. Behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son,  and you shall name him Jesus. He will be great and will be called Son of  the Most High, and the Lord God will give him the throne of David his  father, and he will rule over the house of Jacob forever, and of his  kingdom there will be no end.”

But Mary said to the angel, “How  can this be, since I have no relations with a man?” And the angel said  to her in reply, “The holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of  the Most High will overshadow you. Therefore the child to be born will  be called holy, the Son of God….

Mt.1,18 “Now this is how  the birth of Jesus Christ came about. When his mother Mary was betrothed  to Joseph, but before they lived together, she was found with child  through the holy Spirit.”

 

Her age:

It is very clear  that Mary was betrothed to Joseph and marriage was imminent.  The usual  age for marriage under Jewish law is 13 for boys, 12 for girls.   Considering the circumstances described in the Gospel and giving enough  weight to Jewish practices 2000 years back Mary was 13 when angel  Gabriel appeared before her.  Please also note that Mary was not  subjected to a physical relation with God.  According to our best knowledge she was 14 at the time of giving birth to Jesus.

According to Jewish tradition in those days, consummation of marriage usually happened as soon as the girl entered puberty and started menstruating. Even though Mary conceived Jesus miraculously, I’m sure God stuck to the normal timeline for these things. So Mary could have been anywhere between 10 to 14 years old when she conceived and then gave birth nine months later. Personally, I think she was probably around 12 or 13.

 

The great Jesuit, Francisco Suárez (1548-1617), who is considered the father of systematic Mariology, provides a survey of the Church Fathers and theologians on this issue in his 1592 treatise, “On the Mysteries of the Life of Christ.” Suárez reports the consensus to be that Mary was around 14 when she conceived Jesus.