Tag: St. Rita of Cascia

Stigmatic Saints You Need To Know

Stigmatic Saints You Need To Know

Stigmata is a term used to describe the manifestations of bodily wounds, scars and pain in locations corresponding to the Crucifixion, wound of Jesus Christ, such as the hands, wrists, and feet. A person bearing the wounds of stigmata is referred to as a Stigmatist or a Stigmatic. Most stigmata give out recurring bleeding that stops and then starts, at times after receiving Holy Communion and a significant portion of stigmatics have shown a strong desire to frequently receive Holy Communion.Classically, Stigmata occur at as many as five locations of the Holy Wounds, which are the hands or wrists, feet, and side (often fatal), and other wounds endured during the Passion, includes wounds caused by a Crown of thorns, though generally invisible, whip lashings or scourging on the back, a wound at his rib, caused by a spear, or lance Nail holes in the wrists, or hands. Nail holes in the ankles, or feet. Formations of the flesh which is in form of nails.Some stigmatics most times feel the pain of wounds with no external marks; this type is referred as “invisible stigmata” Some stigmatics’ wounds don’t seem to clot and seem to stay fresh and uninfected. The blood from the injuries is said, in some cases, to have a pleasant, perfumed odor, known as the Odour of Sanctity. Others were formed through the tears of blood or sweating blood, and wounds to back as from Scourging.

Few of the Stigmata you need to know:

St. Francis of AssisiFeast Day: October 4.
He turns out to be the first recorded stigmatic in Christian history. He is the founder of the Franciscans and one of the great saints of the Catholic Church. St. Francis, as is common among stigmatics, was significantly inquisitive about realizing the suffering of Christ. When he was young, he was fun loving and not particularly pious, but two brushes with death showed him the frivolity of his ways and he became extremely pious. He wanted to know the suffering of Christ. His stigmata weren’t hurt, open wounds, but scars; his flesh took on the appearance of nails.

St. Padre Pio
Feast: September 23
One of the best-known stigmatics, St.Pio of Pietrelcina bore the stigmata for over fifty years. Being that Padre Pio lived during the 20th century, and his stigmata were studied by several 20th-century physicians, his stigmata were also studied under the scrutiny of contemporary medicine. Whereas, no one has been ready to realize a natural cause for his wounds. The observations were reportedly self-contradictory and therefore the wounds never became infected. His wounds healed once but reappeared later on.

St. Catherine of Siena
Feast: April 29
St. Catherine of Siena got the stigmata in 1375.
After she received Holy Communion at the Church of St.Christina, red rays shot out from the crucifix and punctured her. St.Catherine’s wounds were invisible to individuals aside from herself until she died.

St. Faustina Kowalska (1905-1938)
Feast: October 5
The Polish nun St. Faustina Kowalska is a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy, who was known for receiving the image of Divine Mercy and giving the church the prayer from Jesus Christ referred to as Chaplet of Divine Mercy. As a sign of her union with God, she also received the invisible stigmata in April 1936. Although invisible, the wounds remained with Faustina the rest of her relatively short life which is one among many graces from God.

St. Rita of Cascia (1381-1457)
Feast: May 22
St. Rita of Cascia received the stigmata 5 years before the end of her extraordinary life. After which she was widowed and lost her two sons, she entered the monastery of St.Mary Magdalene at Cascia, where she received the stigmata in the form of the wounds in her forehead from the Crown of Thorns after hearing a sermon in 1441 on the crown of thorns. Many witnessed a mysterious flash of light that came forth from this wound. Rita bore the stigma throughout her life.

St. Catherine of Siena
She was Dominican nun and Doctor of the Church. She received the wounds of the stigmata during a visit to Pisa in 1375. The wound is visible but it became hidden after Catherine prayed to Jesus that he should remove them so she would not be a subject of sensationalism for others. God granted her request.

St. Teresa of Avila (1515-1582)

Doctor of the Church and author of various mystical classics such as Autobiography (1565), The Way of Perfection (1573), and the Interior Castle (1577), received a stigma of the heart known as transverberation. Her wound was examined in 1872 by three physicians from the University of Salamanca and was verified as a puncture of the heart.

St. Gemma Galgani (1878-1903)
She received the sacred stigmata on the 8th of June, 1899. At this point, the Blessed Virgin Mary appeared to her along with her Son, Jesus. Gemma saw flames of fire issuing forth from our Lord’s wounds, which suddenly appeared on her own body in the exact locations as the wounds of Christ. Not too eager to become a showpiece for others, Gemma asked our Lord to remove the visible wounds. Her request was granted. But, she didn’t really lose her wounds at all; rather, they became invisible and lasted for succeeding 3 years till her death.

Saint Christina of Stommeln
She received wounds on her hands, feet, forehead, and side. According to legend, her wounds bled every Easter.

Do You Know These 4 Saints of Impossible Causes?

Do You Know These 4 Saints of Impossible Causes?

There are instances in every person’s life when it seems that a problem is insurmountable or a cross is unbearable. In these cases, pray to the patron saints of impossible causes: St. Rita of Cascia, St. Jude Thaddeus, St. Philomena and St. Gregory of Neocaesarea.

Read their life stories below.

These 4 saints are known especially for their prowess in interceding for impossible, hopeless, and lost causes.

1. ST. RITA OF CASCIA

St. Rita was born in 1381 in Roccaporena, Italy. She lived a very difficult life on earth, but she never let it destroy her faith.

Although she had a deep wish to enter religious life, her parents arranged her marriage at a young age to a cruel and unfaithful man. Because of Rita’s prayers, he finally experienced a conversion after almost 20 years of unhappy marriage, only to be murdered by an enemy soon after his conversion. Her two sons became ill and died following their father’s death, leaving Rita without family.

She hoped again to enter the religious life, but was denied entrance to the Augustinian convent many times before finally being accepted. Upon entry, Rita was asked to tend to a dead piece of vine as an act of obedience. She watered the stick obediently, and it inexplicably yielded grapes. The plant still grows at the convent, and its leaves are distributed to those seeking miraculous healing.St. Rita statue

For the rest of her life until her death in 1457, Rita experienced illness and an ugly, open wound on her forehead that repulsed those around her. Like the other calamities in her life, she accepted this situation with grace, viewing her wound as a physical participation in Jesus’ suffering from His crown of thorns.

Although her life was filled with seemingly impossible circumstances and causes for despair, St. Rita never lost her faith weakened in her resolve to love God.

Her feast day is May 22. Countless miracles have been attributed to her intercession.

2. ST. JUDE THADDEUS

Not much is known of St. Jude‘s life, although he is perhaps the most popular patron of impossible causes.

St. Jude was one of Jesus’ Twelve Apostles and preached the Gospel with great passion, often in the most difficult circumstances. He is believed to have been martyred for his faith while preaching to pagans in Persia.

He is often depicted with a flame above his head, representing his presence at Pentecost, a medallion with an image of Christ’St. Jude statues face around his neck, symbolizing his relationship with the Lord, and a staff, indicative of his role in leading people to the Truth.

He is the patron of impossible causes because the scriptural Letter of St. Jude, which he authored, urges Christians to persevere in difficult times. Also, St. Bridget of Sweden was directed by Our Lord to turn to St. Jude with great faith and confidence. In a vision, Christ told St. Bridget, “In accordance with his surname, Thaddeus, the amiable or loving, he will show himself most willing to give help.” He is the patron of the impossible because Our Lord identified him as a saint ready and willing to assist us in our trials.

His feast day is October 28, and novenas are often prayed for his intercession.

3. ST. PHILOMENA

St. Philomena, whose name means “Daughter of Light,” is one of the earliest known Christian martyrs. Her tomb was discovered in ancient Roman catacombs in 1802.

Very little is known of her life on earth, except that she died a martyr for her faith at the young age of 13 or 14. Of noble birth with Christian convert parents, Philomena dedicated her virginity to Christ. When she refused to marry the Emperor Diocletian, she was cruelly tortured in many ways for over a month. She was scourged, thrown into a river with an anchor around her neck, and shot through with arrows. Miraculously surviving all these attempts on her life, she was finally beheaded. Despite the tortures, she did not waver in her love for Christ and her vow to Him. The miracles attributed to her intercession St. Philomena statuewere so numerous that she was canonized based solely on these miracles and her death as a martyr. She became known as “The Wonder Worker.”

She is represented by a lily for purity, a crown and arrows for martyrdom, and an anchor. The anchor, found inscribed on her tomb, one of her instruments of torture, was a popular early Christian symbol of hope.

Her feast day is celebrated on August 11th. Besides impossible causes, she is also the patroness of babies, orphans, and youth.

4. ST. GREGORY OF THAUMATURGUS

St. Gregory Neocaesarea, also known as St. Gregory Thaumaturgus (the Wonderworker) was born in Asia Minor around the year 213. Although raised as a pagan, at age 14 he was deeply influenced by a good teacher, and thus converted to Christianity with his brother. At the age of 40 he became a bishop in Caesarea, and served the Church in this role until his death 30 years later. According to ancient records, there were only 17 Christians in Caesarea when he first became a bishop. Many people were converted by his words and by his miracles which showed that the power of God was with him. When he died, there were only 17 pagans left in all of Caesarea.

According to St. Basil the Great, St. Gregory Thaumaturgus (the Wonderworker) is comparable to Moses, the prophets, and the Twelve Apostles. St. Gregory of Nyssa says Gregory Thaumaturgus experienced a vision of Our Lady, one of the first such recorded visions.

St. Gregory of Neocaesarea’s feast day is November 17th.

These 4 saints are known especially for their prowess in interceding for impossible, hopeless, and lost causes.

God often permits trials in our lives so that we can learn to rely only on Him. To encourage our love for His saints and to give us holy models of heroic virtue who persevered through suffering, He also permits prayers to be answered through their intercession.

If any of these 4 saints of impossible causes have been powerful intercessors for difficult circumstances in your own life, please comment below with your story.

 

Source: catholiccompany.com



Astonishing Miracles That Led to St. Rita’s canonization

Astonishing Miracles That Led to St. Rita’s canonization

The incorrupt body of St. Rita at Basilica of St Rita in Cascia, Italy

The “Patron Saint of the Impossible” has always been associated with the miraculous.

St. Rita of Cascia was a humble and holy woman who lived in the 15th century. Both during life and after death, St. Rita was a powerful intercessor, always praying for those most in need.

After dying from tuberculosis, Rita was almost immediately connected to multiple miracles. According to author Bert Ghezzi, “Three days later, Domenico Angeli, a notary of Cascia, recorded eleven miracles that occurred upon the saint’s death.”

Ever since then she has been widely known as a miraculous intercessor, with countless miracles occurring through her heavenly intercession, especially for impossible causes.

Yet, it wasn’t until 1900 that Rita was officially canonized. It took three astonishing miracles to pave the way for her canonization, proving that the faithful can pray to this powerful saint without hesitation. Here is a record of these three miracles as noted in the official decree of canonization.

The first miracle consists of that pleasing scent emanating from the remains of the Saint’s body, the existence of which is confirmed by many reliable witnesses and trustworthy tradition, so that to doubt concerning this fact would be absurd; moreover no natural cause can be given for the existence of this odor, as we see from the physical research which has been made by men most skilled in such things. Furthermore this odor diffuses itself in a manner above the usual laws of nature. Hence we should be persuaded that this fragrance has its origin through divine intervention.

The other miracle happened to Elizabeth Bergamini, a young girl in danger of losing her sight from smallpox. Her parents, assured by the physicians that the child’s condition was so serious that medical aid could be of no avail, decided to send her to the Augustinian Convent at Cascia, beseeching St. Rita fervently to deliver their daughter from approaching blindness. Arriving at the convent, the child was clothed with a votive dress in honor of St. Rita. After four months Elizabeth cried out one day that she could see. Together with the nuns she immediately began to give thanks to God who had wrought such a miracle through St. Rita.

The third miracle happened to Cosimo Pelligrini, suffering from chronic catarrhal gastro-enteritis and hemorrhoidal affliction so serious that there was no hope of recovery. Returning one day from church he became so weak from a new attack of his excruciating malady, that he was near death. Doctors, being summoned, ordered him to receive the last Sacraments, receiving which he lay in the bed with every appearance of approaching death, when suddenly he seemed to see St. Rita in the attitude of greeting him. Thereupon his former strength and appetite returned to him, and within a very short time he was able to do the work of a young man, although he was advanced in years, being a septuagenarian.

Prayer to St. Rita for her intercession in impossible causes.

O Holy Patroness of those in need, St. Rita, whose pleadings before thy Divine Lord are almost irresistible, who for thy lavishness in granting favors hast been called the Advocate of the Hopeless and even of the Impossible; St. Rita, so humble, so pure, so mortified, so patient and of such compassionate love for thy Crucified Jesus that thou couldst obtain from Him whatsoever thou askest, on account of which all confidently have recourse to thee expecting, if not always relief, at least comfort; be propitious to our petition, showing thy power with God on behalf of thy suppliant; be lavish to us, as thou hast been in so many wonderful cases, for the greater glory of God, for the spreading of thine own devotion, and for the consolation of those who trust in thee.

We promise, if our petition is granted, to glorify thee by making known thy favor, to bless and sing thy praises forever. Relying then upon thy merits and power before the Sacred Heart of Jesus, we pray thee grant that [here mention your petition]. Pray for us, O holy St. Rita, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.