Tag: Principles For Long Life

12 Principles For A Long Life – 105 Year Old Japanese Doctor

12 Principles For A Long Life – 105 Year Old Japanese Doctor

It’s worth it to spend 3 minutes of your day reading this

For a medical specialist in longevity, no presentation of his professional abilities can be better than his own life, and that is only one of the attributes that classify the Japanese doctor Shigeaki Hinohara as the teacher and the great inspiration that he was.

He died at 105 years old and still working, having lived his long life with impeccable mental and physical health. Dr. Shigeaki left not only his history of intense dedication to medicine and more humane care with his patients, but also some advice to live a good life and longevity, as part of his legacy.

Born in 1911, Hinohara became one of the world’s doctors with the most time dedicated to the health and happiness of his patients. And the term “happiness” here is not used by chance: the doctor was a pioneer in the most personal and individual treatment with patients and, even after his death, continues as inspiration to improve the quality of our lives.

There is no doubt: Dr. Shigeaki understood life, and therefore, it is worth remembering here his 12 most important advice , taken from an interview that the doctor gave at 97 years.

Some principles of Dr. Shigeaki Hinohara:

1 . Eat well
“All those who live a long life, regardless of their nationality, race or gender, have one thing in common: they are not overweight.”

2 – Do not take shortcuts
“To stay healthy, always climb stairs and load your own things. I climb the steps two at a time, to exercise my muscles. ”

3 – Rediscover your youthful energy
“The energy comes from feeling good, not from eating well or sleeping a lot. We all remember when we were children and we were having fun, how we forgot to eat or sleep. I think we can maintain that adult attitude. It is better not to tire the body with too many rules such as the time to eat and sleep. ”

4 – Keep busy
“Always plan ahead. My agenda is already complete for the next 5 years, with lectures and my usual work, at the hospital. ”

5 – Keep working
“There is no need to retire ever, but if necessary, it must be much later than 65 years. Fifty years ago, there were only 125 Japanese people over 100 years old. Today, they are more than 36 thousand. ”

6 – Keep contributing to society
“After a certain age, we must strive to contribute to society. From the age of 65 I work as a volunteer. I still work 18 hours, 7 days a week and I love every minute. ”

7 – Spread your knowledge
“Share what you know. I give 150 lectures a year, some for 100 secondary school children, some for 4,500 entrepreneurs. I usually speak for an hour, an hour and a half, standing, to be strong. ”

8 – Understand the value of different disciplines
“Science alone can not cure or help people. Science treats us all as one thing, but diseases are individual. Each person is unique, and diseases are connected with their hearts. To understand diseases and help people, we need liberal and visual arts, not just medicine. ”

9 – Follow your instincts
“Contrary to what you imagine, doctors can not cure everything and everyone. So, why cause unnecessary pain, such as surgery, in certain cases? I believe that music and animal therapy can help people more than doctors imagine. ”

10 – Resist materialism
“Do not go crazy for accumulating material things. Remember: you do not know when it will touch you, and we will not take anything from here. ”

11 – Have models of life and inspirations
“Find someone who inspires you to go further. My dad went to study in the United States in 1900, he was a pioneer and one of my heroes. Later I found other life guides, and when I feel paralyzed, I wonder how they would have dealt with the problem. ”

12 – Do not underestimate the power of fun
“Pain is something mysterious, and having fun is the best way to forget it. If a child’s teeth hurt and you start playing with it, you will immediately forget the pain. Hospitals need to cover the basic needs of patients: we all want to have fun. At St. Luke’s Hospital (which he directed and where he worked until the last day) we have music, animal therapy and art classes “.

“My inspiration is Robert Browning’s poem Abt Vogler , which my father used to read to me. He encourages us to make great art, not scribbles. It says that we try to draw a circle so big that there is no way to finish it while we live. All we see is an arch, the rest is beyond sight, but it’s there, in the distance. “