Tag: Apostles’ Creed

What are the 12 beliefs in the Apostles Creed?

What are the 12 beliefs in the Apostles Creed?

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Today at Mass, when we got at article 7 of the recitation of the apostle Creed , I struck me the advent we celebrate is both of the first come and the second coming of Jesus.

I told a group of Catholic youth that Jesus came the first time as the Saviour and Merciful one, his second coming will not be the same. He is coming as a Judge. He will judge the living and the dead with Fire.

I ask myself, Will merciful abound then? No. i don’t think So.

In the apostles creed, each articles has its deeper meaning and reflection. This is the season of Christmas, May his coming be for us Favour and Hope of eternal life for his people.

  1. I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth.
  2. And in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord
  3. Who was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary
  4. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried
  5. He descended into hell.The third day he arose again from the dead
  6. He ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand ofGod the Father Almighty
  7. He will come again to judge the living and the dead
  8. I believe in the Holy Spirit
  9. the holy catholic Church, the Communion of Saints
  10. the forgiveness of sins
  11. the resurrection of the body
  12. And in life everlasting.

Article 7: He will come again to judge the living and the dead. 

This article affirms the Second Coming of Christ at the end of the world to be its judge. Judgment Day, Day of Reckoning, Doomsday—they’re all metaphors for the end of time when what’s known as the General Judgment will occur. Catholics believe that after the death of any human person, immediate private judgment occurs and the person goes directly to heaven, hell, or purgatory (an intermediate place in preparation for heaven)

What does the name Catholic mean?

What does the name Catholic mean?

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Defining The Word Catholic

The word catholic literally means “universal,” as in “the universal church.” It originally was applied to all Christians because we are all part of the universal church in the way that we are all members of the Body of Christ.

Other Meaning

The word Catholic also has its meaning from the Greek, Latin language, and English dictionaries. The Latin calls it,” Catholicus”, while the Greek calls it, “Katholikos.  In General, the Greek word means “on the whole, according to the whole or in general.” The word in English can mean “including a wide variety of things; all-embracing,” or “of the Roman Catholic faith,” or “relating to the historic doctrine and practice of the Western Church.”

History of the Catholic name

Catholic was first used to describe the Christian Church in the early 2nd century to emphasize its universal scope. The term has been incorporated into the name of the largest Christian communion, the Roman Catholic Church.

At the beginning of the second century, we find in the letters of Ignatius the first surviving use of the term “Catholic” in reference to the Church. At that time, or shortly thereafter, it was used to refer to a single, visible communion, separate from others.

The term “Catholic” is in the Apostles’, Nicene, and Athanasian creeds, and many Protestants, claiming the term for themselves, give it a meaning that is unsupported historically, ignoring the term’s use at the time the creeds were written.

According to an early Church Historian J. N. D. Kelly, a Protestant, writes and I quote him: “As regards ‘Catholic,’ its original meaning was ‘universal’ or ‘general.’ . . . in the latter half of the second century at latest, we find it conveying the suggestion that the Catholic is the true Church as distinct from heretical congregations (cf., e.g., Muratorian Canon) . . . . What these early Fathers were envisaging was almost always the empirical, visible society; they had little or no inkling of the distinction which was later to become important between a visible and an invisible Church” (Early Christian Doctrines, 190–1).

St. Augustine wrote and I quote, “We must hold to the Christian religion and to communication in her Church, which is catholic and which is called catholic not only by her own members but even by all her enemies. For when heretics or the adherents of schisms talk about her, not among themselves but with strangers, willy-nilly they call her nothing else but Catholic. For they will not be understood unless they distinguish her by this name which the whole world employs in her regard” (The True Religion 7:12 [A.D. 390]).



Do You Know Your BASIC BELIEFS As A Catholic?

Do You Know Your BASIC BELIEFS As A Catholic?

Creed: The Basic Profession of Faith

From its earliest days, the Church used brief summaries to describe an outline of its most essential beliefs. These summaries are called “creeds”, from the Latin credo, meaning “I believe.” They are also called “professions of faith,” since they summarize the faith that Christians profess. The Catholic Church uses two very old creeds regularly as a part of its liturgy and other prayers. There are a number of other Catholic creeds as well. The older Apostles Creed is brief and simple. It is considered to be a faithful summary of the Apostles’ teaching. It is the ancient baptismal symbol of the Church at Rome. (See Catechism, 194). The longer Catholic Nicene Creed contains some additional language explaining our belief in the Trinity. Another ancient & traditional creed is commonly called the Athanasian Creed, since it was originally attributed to St. Athanasius, who died in 373 A.D. (This creed is no longer officially attributed to him.) It is also called the Quicumque vult, after its first words in Latin. This beautiful creed contains a detailed meditation on the nature of the Trinity.

The Apostles’ Creed

Considered to be a faithful summary of the Apostles’ teaching. It is the ancient baptismal symbol of the Church at Rome.

I believe in God, the Father almighty, creator of heaven and earth.
I believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord.
He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary.
He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried.
He descended into hell. On the third day he rose again.
He ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again to judge the living and the dead.
I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy Catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting.
Amen.

The Nicene Creed

The most ecumenical of creeds, it is the most widely accepted and used brief statements of the Christian Faith. In liturgical churches, it is said every Sunday as part of the Liturgy. It is Common Ground to East Orthodox, Roman Catholics, Anglicans, Lutherans, Calvinists, and many other Christian groups. Many groups that do not have a tradition of using it in their services nevertheless are committed to the doctrines it teaches.

We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty,
maker of heaven and earth, and of all that is, seen and unseen.
We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ, the only Son of God,
eternally begotten of the Father, God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God, begotten, not made, one in Being with the Father.
Through him all things were made.
For us men and for our salvation, he came down from heaven:
by the power of the Holy Spirit he was born of the Virgin Mary, and became man.
For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate; he suffered, died, and was buried.
On the third day he rose again in fulfillment of the Scriptures;
he ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead,
and his kingdom will have no end.
We believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son.
With the Father and the Son he is worshipped and glorified.
He has spoken through the Prophets.
We believe in one holy catholic and apostolic Church.
We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.
We look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come.
Amen.