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Saint of the Day for Wednesday, April 17th, 2019

Saint of the Day for Wednesday, April 17th, 2019

St. Anicetus

Image of St. Anicetus

Facts

Feast day: April 17

Anicetus was a Syrian from Emesa. He became pope about 155 and actively opposed Marcionism and Gnosticism. His pontificate saw the appearance of the controversy between East and West over the date of Easter.

St. Polycarp, a disciple of John, is reported to have visited him in Rome about the dispute, which was to accelerate and grow more heated over the following centuries.

St. Donan

Image of St. Donan

Facts

Feast day: April 17
Patron of Eigg
Death: 617

ST. Donan a remarkable fact about the widespread work of the Celtic missionary saints from the fifth century onwards is that scarcely any cases of violent opposition or martyrdom are recorded until the Viking and Danish raids began at the end of the ninth century. The pagan Celts accepted the missionaries even when they did not accept their religion and pagan and Christian symbols are found side by side on the great pictish stones.

Donan (or Donnan) deserves a note in these pages not only because of the extent of his journeyings but because he and his fellow monks on the island of Eigg provide the most dreadful case of martyrdom in the history of the Celtic Church. He and fifty-two of his followers were butchered within the refectory of the monastery. The only other martyrdoms recorded seem to be those of Constantine of Kintyre and of Kessog, and the latter is doubtful.

Unfortunately the mediaeval Life of Donan is lost, and what little we know of him is limited to the brief comments in such ancient martyrologies as Tallaght, Donegal and Oengus. The date of his birth is not known but he was contemporary with, or a little younger, than Columba. We presume that he was Irish and early in adult life crossed to Galloway. Thereafter we only know him through a chain of Kildonans up the west coast of Scotland, beginning with a Kildonan at Kirkmaiden and a Chapel Donan at Kirkcolm, and terminating at Kildonan on the island of Little Bernera in the Outer Hebrides.

The story of Donan’s martyrdom was by no means unknown in mediaeval Scotland and some commemorations might be due to later interest and veneration. But the plotting of the place-names suggests a logical route of missionary progression northwards. The only St Don- nan’s east of the Great Glen is at Auchterless in Aberdeenshire, and it has been suggested that Donan had a special connection with this parish-there are several place-names and we know his ‘bachail’ or staff was kept there till the Reformation. Perhaps for this very reason the saint’s personal connection with Auchterless is more open to doubt, as the possession of the bachail in mediaeval days might well lead to the name instead of vice versa.

Only one incident is recorded as happening during these missionary years. He crossed to lona to meet Columba, and according to the story, asked that saint to act as his ‘anamchara’ or ‘soul- friend’, which took the place of the Roman Church’s ‘confessor’. Strangely enough, Columba refused to act as anamchara, saying, ‘I shall not be a soul-friend to a company of red-martyrdom.’ Obviously some explanation must be sought for this abrupt refusal. Dr A. B. Scott, who disliked Columba, saw in it the Goidheal’s refusal to have any friendly intercourse with a Pict, but there could be quite different reasons, such as Columba’s unwilling-ness to accept the additional responsibility which the duty entailed.

Donan eventually formed his community on the small island of Eigg, with the monastic buildings on the side facing Arisaig. It had become a large community by the date of the massacre-fifty-two is the number of monks given in the record, although for some unknown reason only fifty names are listed. It has been suggested that the monks are fictional but Dr Scott was sure he had traced local place-names deriving from them.

Did Donan cross from lreland with the nucleus of such a group ready formed? Did he start with one or two and build to over fifty? Any answer to such questions would be as vague as the reason for the sudden unprecedented attack. On this subject scholars have made much of an obscure statement in the martyrologies that the monks’ keeping sheep on the island had angered a local woman of importance. Scott draws the unwarranted conclusion that when the local folk refused to take action she deliberately bribed a group of pirates to make the attack.

It cannot, of course, be proved that she did not do so, so the reason for the brutality must remain conjectural. Pirates were by no means unknown but it is doubtful that they would take time to raid an obscure, penniless and inoffensive group of monks. It is more likely to have been a very early group of ‘Black Gentiles’ from Jutland or Denmark.

Details of the raid differ. Donan, it is said, was celebrating the Sacrament when the intruders broke in. When he begged for respite till mass was completed, they agreed and he led the monks across to the refectory ‘that the place where God had been worshipped in spiritual joy might not be polluted with their blood’. The Martyrology of Donegal then states that ‘he was beheaded and 52 of the monks with him’ while that of Oengus suggests that the building was set on fire and they all perished in the flames. The traditional year of the massacre was 618.

Donan’s festival is 16 or 17 April. From the book SAINTS OF SCOTLAND by Edwin Sprott Towill, publishers: St. Andrew’s Press

St. Fortunatus & Marcian

Facts

Feast day: April 17
Death: unknown

Martyrs of Antioch, in Syria, or of an African location.

St. Peter and Hermogenes

Facts

Feast day: April 17
Death: unknown

Roman martyrs of an uncertain era who were put to death, probably at Antioch, Syria, during the Christian persecution. Peter was a deacon and Hermogenes his servant.

  • St. Robert of Chaise Dieu
  • St. Stephen Harding
  • St. Villicus
  • St. Elias
  • St. Anicetus
  • St. Donan
  • St. Landericus
  • St. Mappalicus
Iconic Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris saved after massive fire incident

Iconic Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris saved after massive fire incident

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A MASSIVE  fire that engulfed the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris, France’s most iconic landmarks, has been brought under control, albeit with significant damages to the building’s spire and roof which collapsed.

Dating back to the 12th and 13th centuries, the Notre Dame Cathedral is a UNESCO World Heritage site. The church receives almost 13 million visitors annually, more than the Eiffel Tower, another iconic landmark in France.

It is not clear yet what caused the fire but there have been renovation works going on in the Cathedral but firefighters worked for several hours to save the historic building from collapsing.

“The structure of the cathedral is saved and the main works of art have been safeguarded, thanks to the combined action of the various services of the State committed to our side,” the Paris fire service tweeted.

After more than 9 hours of fierce fighting, nearly 400 firefighters from Paris have overcome the appalling fire. 2 police officers and a firefighter were slightly injured.

View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter
View image on Twitter

Thousands of people gathered in the streets around the cathedral, observing the flames in silence. Some could be seen openly weeping, while others sang hymns or said prayers.

The Paris Prosecutor’s office said investigators have started to hear testimonies from construction workers working on the site to determine what led to the fire.

As a result of the fire, French President, Emmanuel Macron, cancelled his scheduled television address to the protesters that have marched across the streets of Paris for months.

Describing the cathedral as a building for all French people, Macron promised that “we’ll rebuild Notre-Dame together”.

Goodwill messages have been pouring in from all over the world including from the US President, Donald Trump, the UK Prime Minister, Theresa May, and the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel.

Donald Tusk, the President of the European Council, called on all the 28 member states of the European Union to help France rebuild Notre Dame Cathedral.

CNN quoted the mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo, as saying that she plans to hold a “major international conference of donors” to raise money to rebuild Notre Dame Cathedral, but already, donations have started coming in from notable French businessmen for the rebuilding of the historic monument.

“The family of Bernard Arnault, the French business magnate who owns luxury goods and fashion house LVMH, has promised to contribute €200 million,” CNN reports.

Similarly,  French billionaire, François Pinault, also pledged €100 million ($113 million) to the reconstruction of the fire-ravaged cathedral.

Does Attending the Easter Vigil Mass Count for Easter Mass on Sunday?

Does Attending the Easter Vigil Mass Count for Easter Mass on Sunday?

Today i was arguing with a friend if attending Easter Vigil could stand for the Eater Mass? i was of the opinion that they are both the same. However, one can attend both as they both mean blessing from both.

i will not be the only one to discuss this issue. i will be putting forward people ideas about attending both or only one.

Steven Francis

No – Not an obligation

However, I HIGHLY encourage attendance at the Vigil. It is life affirming to see the Church perpetuated in Catecumens, and also to hear the whole history of salvation through scripture. Awesome!!

Apparently, if you DO attend the Vigil it counts for your Sunday obligation. I have some personal heartburn with that, but oh well. I’m not the Pope. Whether obligated or not, I can’t imagine a devout Christian not wanting to observe:

The Triduum Mass which begins on at Sundown on Holy Thursday, and Ends at the conclusion of the Easter Vigl Mass on Holy Saturday. This includes three “meetings” of the faithful all under the SAME MASS. There is no concluding rite until after the Vigil. It is all one mass. Seems to me if you start it, you should finish it. That would inlcude all the meetings of the body. If you went last night, you ARE STILL AT MASS today, (and hopefully fasting).

Thursday evening, Friday evening, and Saturday evening.

Then:
Easter Sunday – as a joyous celebration of the ressurection!!!

Peace

Tantum_ergo

With respect, Steven: Yes, attending any vigil ‘counts’ for the following Sunday or Holy Day of Obligation.

Also, Easter is not a ‘Holy Day of Obligation’–it is a Sunday and all Sundays are days of obligation. Christmas is a holy day of obligation even when it does not fall on a Sunday, but Easter by definition is always on a Sunday.

One is not ‘obliged’ to attend the vigil unless as above, one attends the vigil FOR the Sunday or Holy Day.

The Easter Saturday vigil for Easter Sunday, like any other anticipatory vigil for a Sunday, is not a ‘holy day obligation’ but as I said before, is an anticipation, and under canon law and according to the Catechism, fulfils one’s obligations for the Sunday (in this case) and (as in the Christmas Vigil) would fulfill the obligation for the Christmas Day Mass

OPTM

The easter Vigil Mass is the first Mass of Easter; it celebrates the Lord’s Ressurection, and the whole of salvation history. As far as pomp and ceremony, it is the most ceremonious Mass of Easter.

The Jews considered that the new day started at sunset. The Evening Prayer (Vespers) on Saturday evening is the First Sunday Evening Prayer (Vespers on Sunday afternoon being the second), and if one understands that in the other official Liturgy of the Church – the Liturgy of the Hours – the Church treats Saturday Vespers as the First Sunday Vespers, then it may be easier to understand why the vigil Mass of Sunday, on Saturday evening, is accepted as fulfilling one’s obligation to attend Mass.

CatholicZ09A

You are allowed to go to as many Masses as you wish. The only restriction is how many times you can receive the Blessed Sacrament. You can only receive it twice during one day. The second time; however, you MUST be attending a Mass (two communion services are not allowed). So, if you received it once on Saturday and once on Sunday, you’re fine. So, if you receive on Saturday twice, then you’ve reached your limit. Your first time receiving can be a communion service, a Mass, etc., but your second time must be received with your participation in a Mass.

12 things you need to know about Holy Saturday

12 things you need to know about Holy Saturday

Every time we say the creed, we note that Jesus “descended into hell.”

Holy Saturday is the day that commemorates this event.

What happened on this day, and how do we celebrate it?

Here are 12 things you need to know.

1. What happened on the first Holy Saturday?

Here on earth, Jesus’ disciples mourned his death and, since it was a sabbath day, they rested.

Luke notes that the women returned home “and prepared spices and ointments. On the sabbath they rested according to the commandment” (Luke 23:56).

At the tomb, the guards that had been stationed there kept watch over the place to make sure that the disciples did not steal Jesus’ body.

Meanwhile . . .

2. What happened to Jesus while he was dead?

According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

633 Scripture calls the abode of the dead, to which the dead Christ went down, “hell” – Sheol in Hebrew or Hades in Greek – because those who are there are deprived of the vision of God.

Such is the case for all the dead, whether evil or righteous, while they await the Redeemer: which does not mean that their lot is identical, as Jesus shows through the parable of the poor man Lazarus who was received into “Abraham’s bosom”:

“It is precisely these holy souls, who awaited their Saviour in Abraham’s bosom, whom Christ the Lord delivered when he descended into hell.”

Jesus did not descend into hell to deliver the damned, nor to destroy the hell of damnation, but to free the just who had gone before him.

634 “The gospel was preached even to the dead.” The descent into hell brings the Gospel message of salvation to complete fulfillment.

This is the last phase of Jesus’ messianic mission, a phase which is condensed in time but vast in its real significance: the spread of Christ’s redemptive work to all men of all times and all places, for all who are saved have been made sharers in the redemption.

3. How do we commemorate this day?

According to the main document governing the celebrations connected with Easter, Paschales Solemnitatis:

73. On Holy Saturday the Church is, as it were, at the Lord’s tomb, meditating on his passion and death, and on his descent into hell, and awaiting his resurrection with prayer and fasting.

It is highly recommended that on this day the Office of Readings and Morning Prayer be celebrated with the participation of the people (cf. n. 40).

Where this cannot be done, there should be some celebration of the Word of God, or some act of devotion suited to the mystery celebrated this day.

74. The image of Christ crucified or lying in the tomb, or the descent into hell, which mystery Holy Saturday recalls, as also an image of the sorrowful Virgin Mary can be placed in the church for the veneration of the faithful.

Fasting is also encouraged, but not required, on this day.

4. Are the sacraments celebrated?

For the most part, no. Paschales Solemnitatis explains:

75. On this day the Church abstains strictly from the celebration of the sacrifice of the Mass.

Holy Communion may only be given in the form of Viaticum.

The celebration of marriages is forbidden, as also the celebration of other sacraments, except those of Penance and the Anointing of the Sick.The prohibition on saying Mass applies to the part of the day before the Easter Vigil Mass (see below).

Baptism in danger of death is also permitted.

5. What is the Easter Vigil?

A vigil is the liturgical commemoration of a notable feast, held on the evening preceding the feast.

The term comes from the Latin word vigilia, which means “wakefulness,” and which came to be used when the faithful stayed awake to pray and do devotional exercises in anticipation of the feast.

Easter Vigil is the vigil held on the evening before Easter.

According to Paschales Solemnitatis.

80. From the very outset the Church has celebrated that annual Pasch, which is the solemnity of solemnities, above all by means of a night vigil.

For the resurrection of Christ is the foundation of our faith and hope, and through Baptism and Confirmation we are inserted into the Paschal Mystery of Christ, dying, buried, and raised with him, and with him we shall also reign.

The full meaning of Vigil is a waiting for the coming of the Lord.

6. When should Easter Vigil be celebrated?

Paschales Solemnitatis explains:

 78. “The entire celebration of the Easter Vigil takes place at night. It should not begin before nightfall; it should end before daybreak on Sunday.”

This rule is to be taken according to its strictest sense. Reprehensible are those abuses and practices which have crept into many places in violation of this ruling, whereby the Easter Vigil is celebrated at the time of day that it is customary to celebrate anticipated Sunday Masses.

Those reasons which have been advanced in some quarters for the anticipation of the Easter Vigil, such as lack of public order, are not put forward in connection with Christmas night, nor other gatherings of various kinds.

7. What happens at the Easter Vigil?

According to Paschales Solemnitatis:

81. The order for the Easter Vigil is arranged so that

  • after the service of light and the Easter Proclamation (which is the first part of the Vigil), 
  • Holy Church meditates on the wonderful works which the Lord God wrought for his people from the earliest times (the second part or Liturgy of the Word), 
  • to the moment when, together with those new members reborn in Baptism (third part), 
  • she is called to the table prepared by the Lord for his Church—the commemoration of his death and resurrection—until he comes (fourth part). 

8. What happens during the service of light?

According to Paschales Solemnitatis:

82. . . . In so far as possible, a suitable place should be prepared outside the church for the blessing of the new fire, whose flames should be such that they genuinely dispel the darkness and light up the night.

The paschal candle should be prepared, which for effective symbolism must be made of wax, never be artificial, be renewed each year, be only one in number, and be of sufficiently large size so that it may evoke the truth that Christ is the light of the world. It is blessed with the signs and words prescribed in the Missal or by the Conference of Bishops.

83. The procession, by which the people enter the church, should be led by the light of the paschal candle alone. Just as the children of Israel were guided at night by a pillar of fire, so similarly, Christians follow the risen Christ. There is no reason why to each response “Thanks be to God” there should not be added some acclamation in honor of Christ.

The light from the paschal candle should be gradually passed to the candles which it is fitting that all present should hold in their hands, the electric lighting being switched off.

9. What happens during the Easter Proclamation?

According to Paschales Solemnitatis:

 84. The deacon makes the Easter Proclamation which tells, by means of a great poetic text, the whole Easter mystery placed in the context of the economy of salvation.

In case of necessity, where there is no deacon, and the celebrating priest is unable to sing it, a cantor may do so.

The Bishops’ Conferences may adapt this proclamation by inserting into it acclamations from the people.

10. What happens during the Scripture readings?

According to Paschales Solemnitatis:

85. The readings from Sacred Scripture constitute the second part of the Vigil. They give an account of the outstanding deeds of the history of salvation, which the faithful are helped to meditate calmly upon by the singing of the responsorial psalm, by a silent pause and by the celebrant’s prayer.

The restored Order for the Vigil has seven readings from the Old Testament chosen from the Law and the Prophets, which are in use everywhere according to the most ancient tradition of East and West, and two readings from the New Testament, namely from the Apostle and from the Gospel.

Thus the Church, “beginning with Moses and all the Prophets” explains Christ’s Paschal Mystery.

Consequently wherever this is possible, all the readings should be read so that the character of the Easter Vigil, which demands that it be somewhat prolonged, be respected at all costs.

Where, however, pastoral conditions require that the number of readings be reduced, there should be at least three readings from the Old Testament, taken from the Law and the Prophets; the reading from Exodus chapter 14 with its canticle must never be omitted.

87. After the readings from the Old Testament, the hymn “Gloria in excelsis” is sung, the bells are rung in accordance with local custom, the collect is recited, and the celebration moves on to the readings from the New Testament. An exhortation from the Apostle on Baptism as an insertion into Christ’s Paschal Mystery is read.

Then all stand and the priest intones the “Alleluia” three times, each time raising the pitch. The people repeat it after him.

If it is necessary, the psalmist or cantor may sing the “Alleluia,” which the people then take up as an acclamation to be interspersed between the verses of Psalm 117, so often cited by the Apostles in their Easter preaching.

Finally, the resurrection of the Lord is proclaimed from the Gospel as the high point of the whole Liturgy of the Word.

After the Gospel a homily is to be given, no matter how brief.

11. What happens during the baptismal liturgy?

According to Paschales Solemnitatis:

88. The third part of the Vigil is the baptismal liturgy. Christ’s passover and ours is now celebrated.

This is given full expression in those churches which have a baptismal font, and more so when the Christian initiation of adults is held, or at least the Baptism of infants.

Even if there are no candidates for Baptism, the blessing of baptismal water should still take place in parish churches. If this blessing does not take place at the baptismal font, but in the sanctuary, baptismal water should be carried afterwards to the baptistry there to be kept throughout the whole of paschal time.

Where there are neither candidates for Baptism nor any need to bless the font, Baptism should be commemorated by the blessing of water destined for sprinkling upon the people.

89. Next follows the renewal of baptismal promises, introduced by some words on the part of the celebrating priest.

The faithful reply to the questions put to them, standing and holding lighted candles in their hands. They are then sprinkled with water: in this way the gestures and words remind them of the Baptism they have received.

The celebrating priest sprinkles the people by passing through the main part of the church while all sing the antiphon “Vidi aquam” or another suitable song of a baptismal character.

12. What happens during the Eucharistic liturgy?

According to Paschales Solemnitatis:

90. The celebration of the Eucharist forms the fourth part of the Vigil and marks its high point, for it is in the fullest sense the Easter Sacrament, that is to say, the commemoration of the Sacrifice of the Cross and the presence of the risen Christ, the completion of Christian initiation, and the foretaste of the eternal pasch.

92. It is fitting that in the Communion of the Easter Vigil full expression be given to the symbolism of the Eucharist, namely by consuming the Eucharist under the species of both bread and wine. The local Ordinaries will consider the appropriateness of such a concession and its ramifications.