Category: Catholics Online

5 Five Steps to Qualifies for Annulment Process

5 Five Steps to Qualifies for Annulment Process

Image result for How long do you have to annul a marriage?

To qualify for an annulment, a marriage must be legally void or voidable. Void means that it is not valid, while voidable means that a court can declare it to be invalid if it is challenged. To be eligible for an annulment you must be able to prove one of the specific grounds to establish that your marriage is void or voidable.

Step 1: Meet one of the legal grounds for annulment

Although the grounds vary from state to state, several reasons for annulment are common to all states. An annulment is possible, If a spouse did not have the legal capacity or the legal intent to enter into the marriage, . Some common reasons that a spouse does not have the legal capacity to marry include a preexisting marriage, mental incapacity or being underage. Another reason is consanguinity, or a marriage between close relatives, which is illegal.

Step 2: Determine if you were married without the proper intent

A person who marries under fraudulent circumstances or under duress lacks the proper intent to enter into a marriage. For example, a person with false identity commits fraud if he marries someone who has no knowledge of his true identity. Another example is a sham marriage, in which the parties marry to deceive a government or corporate entity. A marriage that has not been consummated by physical relations can be annulled in some states.

Step 3: Become the innocent spouse in your marriage

Be the innocent spouse in your marriage in order to file for an annulment. In some states and under certain circumstances, the wrongdoer in a marriage cannot be the plaintiff in a lawsuit for annulment. For example, if a man forced you to marry him under duress, he cannot file for annulment himself. Or, if you were tricked into marrying someone but remained married after you learned the truth, you cannot file for an annulment in many states because your actions retroactively approved the marriage agreement.

Step 4: Meet the requirement for residency in the country you reside

Meet the residency requirements for the county and state where you seek an annulment. Usually, you or your spouse must have lived in the county for at least 90 days prior to filing for an annulment. Many states require a much longer period of residency. A lawyer or other officer of the court can tell you if you meet the residency requirements.

Step 5: Meet your state’s statute of limitations for annulment

For example, you might have to file within 90 days of the wedding ceremony, depending on the reason you are filing. You can find out if your state requires you to file within a certain time frame by consulting a lawyer, or you can look up this information in your state’s code of laws. You can usually find the state code online by conducting an Internet search or in a public library.

 

Can Catholics get divorced?

Can Catholics get divorced?

I must answer with a bitter truth, Catholics cannot get Divorced. This does not stop annulment of marriage. Marriage can get annulment when the marriage was embedded in lies.

Catholic Church generally requires civil divorce or annulment procedures to have been completed before it will consider annulment cases.

What does the Catholic Church teach about divorce?

The Catholic Church does not permit divorce for valid sacramental marriages. In fact a valid sacramental marriage is impossible to dissolve thereby making divorce not possible if the marriage was sacramental.

In marriage, the two become one flesh in a union joined by God, (Mark 10:8). Jesus speaks about divorce: “Therefore what God has joined together, no human being must separate,” (Mark 10:9). So for a marriage that meets the requirements of being a sacrament, divorce in the Catholic Church is not possible.

The annulment process determines the validity of the marriage. It is not a Catholic divorce process. If it found to be invalid (not meeting the requirements of a sacramental marriage) then an annulment would be granted.

Marriage directly parallels our relationship with God. God is 100% faithful in his relationship with us those who choose to get married are called to the same faithfulness.

What about if one spouse is abusive or unfaithful?

There are some cases where living together has become too difficult or practically impossible. The Church permits a physical separation of the spouses and living apart, but the two still remain married until an annulment is granted (if applicable).

“The Christian community is called to help these persons live out their situation in a Christian manner and in fidelity to their marriage bond which remains indissoluble,” (The Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1649).

Isn’t an annulment just a Catholic divorce?

No. An annulment is not a Catholic divorce. It says that the marriage never met the conditions to be considered sacramental. If at least one criterion for sacramental marriage was not met then the marriage can be considered invalid and an annulment will be granted.

The annulment process is often long, usually lasting about a year or longer; the people who make up the marriage tribunal for your diocese must perform extensive research in determining if an annulment can be granted.

Can a divorce Catholic remarry?

Perhaps, but only if you have received an annulment (which means your previous marriage was not considered a valid sacrament). If you receive a civil divorce, but no annulment, then you are still married to the other person in the eyes of the Church and would be committing adultery if you married another.

Jesus says, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another, commits adultery against her and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery,” (Mark 10:11-12).

As a divorced Catholic, can i received communion?

If your previous marriage was not annulled and you chose to remarry, then no, because you would be in adulterous relationship and in a state of mortal sin. Otherwise it is perfectly acceptable to receive the Eucharist if you are divorced.

What percentage of Catholic marriages end in divorce?

What percentage of Catholic marriages end in divorce?

Image result for Can Catholics get divorced?

Divorce Percentage cases

According to the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University, an estimated 28 percent of American Catholic adults who have ever been married have since divorced. That rate is lower than in the general public, but still constitutes 11 million people, the researchers said.

Bishops Resolve on Divorce

In October, bishops from around the world argued about divorce, among other topics, at a synod on family issues; this October, a larger group of bishops will meet for a second Vatican synod at which they will decide whether to recommend changes. The decision of whether to act, then, will be up to Francis

Church offer for Divorce

“There’s a lot of divorced Catholics out there, and have we let these sheep wander without reaching out to them?” Ms. Alvaré asked. “Jesus wants us to look after all the sheep, no matter what.”

The church does offer a solution for some divorced Catholics: Apply for an annulment, a declaration by the church that a marriage was never truly valid.

Stories behind Divorces Cases

Still, for many, the church makes too many demands for re-entry to church life. It is often as if there are only two options, many Catholics said: Be dishonest or depart.

Some Catholics said they did not want to annul their marriages because of how it might look or feel for their children — although in the eyes of the church, an annulment has no implications for the legitimacy of children. Others said their divorces had been so contentious that they did not want to take part in a process in which the church asked them to share information about their romantic or emotional lives or sought to contact their former spouses.

“I was married — I entered into it with the right ideas, and to say different would be a lie,” said Carol Trankle, 72, of Rapid City, S.D., who stopped going to church 40 years ago.

“I consider myself a Catholic to this day,” she said. “I just can’t participate.”

The 4 Patron Saints of Impossible Causes

The 4 Patron Saints of Impossible Causes

The 4 Patron Saints of Impossible Causes

There are instances in every person’s life when it seems that a problem is insurmountable or a cross is unbearable.  In these cases, pray to the patron saints of impossible causes:

  1. St. Rita of Cascia,
  2. St. Jude Thaddeus,
  3. St. Philomena and
  4. St. Gregory of Neocaesarea.

Read their life stories below.

ST. RITA OF CASCIA

St. Rita of CasciaSt. Rita was born in 1381 in Roccaporena, Italy. She lived a very difficult life on earth, but she never let it destroy her faith.

Although she had a deep wish to enter religious life, her parents arranged her marriage at a young age to a cruel and unfaithful man. Because of Rita’s prayers, he finally experienced a conversion after almost 20 years of unhappy marriage, only to be murdered by an enemy soon after his conversion. Her two sons became ill and died following their father’s death, leaving Rita without family.

She hoped again to enter the religious life, but was denied entrance to the Augustinian convent many times before finally being accepted. Upon entry, Rita was asked to tend to a dead piece of vine as an act of obedience. She watered the stick obediently, and it inexplicably yielded grapes. The plant still grows at the convent, and its leaves are distributed to those seeking miraculous healing.St. Rita statue

For the rest of her life until her death in 1457, Rita experienced illness and an ugly, open wound on her forehead that repulsed those around her. Like the other calamities in her life, she accepted this situation with grace, viewing her wound as a physical participation in Jesus’ suffering from His crown of thorns.

Although her life was filled with seemingly impossible circumstances and causes for despair, St. Rita never lost her faith weakened in her resolve to love God.

Her feast day is May 22. Countless miracles have been attributed to her intercession.

ST. JUDE THADDEUS

St. JudeNot much is known of St. Jude‘s life, although he is perhaps the most popular patron of impossible causes.

St. Jude was one of Jesus’ Twelve Apostles and preached the Gospel with great passion, often in the most difficult circumstances. He is believed to have been martyred for his faith while preaching to pagans in Persia.

He is often depicted with a flame above his head, representing his presence at Pentecost, a medallion with an image of Christ’St. Jude statues face around his neck, symbolizing his relationship with the Lord, and a staff, indicative of his role in leading people to the Truth.

He is the patron of impossible causes because the scriptural Letter of St. Jude, which he authored, urges Christians to persevere in difficult times.  Also, St. Bridget of Sweden was directed by Our Lord to turn to St. Jude with great faith and confidence. In a vision, Christ told St. Bridget, “In accordance with his surname, Thaddeus, the amiable or loving, he will show himself most willing to give help.” He is the patron of the impossible because Our Lord identified him as a saint ready and willing to assist us in our trials.

His feast day is October 28, and novenas are often prayed for his intercession. Find a website dedicated to his intercession.

ST. PHILOMENA

St. PhilomenaSt. Philomena, whose name means “Daughter of Light,” is one of the earliest known Christian martyrs. Her tomb was discovered in ancient Roman catacombs in 1802.

Very little is known of her life on earth, except that she died a martyr for her faith at the young age of 13 or 14. Of noble birth with Christian convert parents, Philomena dedicated her virginity to Christ.  When she refused to marry the Emperor Diocletian, she was cruelly tortured in many ways for over a month. She was scourged, thrown into a river with an anchor around her neck, and shot through with arrows.  Miraculously surviving all these attempts on her life, she was finally beheaded. Despite the tortures, she did not waver in her love for Christ and her vow to Him. The miracles attributed to her intercession St. Philomena statuewere so numerous that she was canonized based solely on these miracles and her death as a martyr.  She became known as “The Wonder Worker.”

She is represented by a lily for purity, a crown and arrows for martyrdom, and an anchor. The anchor, found inscribed on her tomb, one of her instruments of torture, was a popular early Christian symbol of hope.

Her feast day is celebrated on August 11th. Besides impossible causes, she is also the patroness of babies, orphans, and youth. Find a novena prayer to St. Philomena

ST. GREGORY OF THAUMATURGUS

St. Gregory ThaumaturgusSt. Gregory Neocaesarea, also known as St. Gregory Thaumaturgus (the Wonderworker) was born in Asia Minor around the year 213. Although raised as a pagan, at age 14 he was deeply influenced by a good teacher, and thus converted to Christianity with his brother. At the age of 40 he became a bishop in Caesarea, and served the Church in this role until his death 30 years later. According to ancient records, there were only 17 Christians in Caesarea when he first became a bishop. Many people were converted by his words and by his miracles which showed that the power of God was with him. When he died, there were only 17 pagans left  in all of Caesarea.

According to St. Basil the Great, St. Gregory Thaumaturgus (the Wonderworker) is comparable to Moses, the prophets, and the Twelve Apostles.  St. Gregory of Nyssa says Gregory Thaumaturgus experienced a vision of Our Lady, one of the first such recorded visions.

St. Gregory of Neocaesarea’s feast day is November 17th.

 

These 4 saints are known especially for their prowess in interceding for impossible, hopeless, and lost causes.

God often permits trials in our lives so that we can learn to rely only on Him.  To encourage our love for His saints and to give us holy models of heroic virtue who persevered through suffering, He also permits prayers to be answered through their intercession.

If any of these 4 saints of impossible causes have been powerful intercessors for difficult circumstances in your own life, please comment below with your story.