14 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Girl

14 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Girl

14 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Girl

Before we begin:

We can skip the obvious, The Blessed Virgin Mary: Queen of all Saints, of heaven and earth. There is really no better model for your baby girl than her. Obidience, humility, courage, all of the virtues and gifts of heaven were in her.

Humbeline:

Benedictine abbess and younger sister of St. Bernard of Clairvaux, France. Married and socially popular, Humbeline visited her brother and underwent a personal conversion. She received permission from her husband, Guy de Marcy, to enter the Benedictines at Jully les Nonnais, becoming abbess and succeeding her sister in law, Elizabeth. Humbeline died in her brother’s arms.

Adeline:

Adeline was the sister of Blessed Vitale, Abbot of Savigny and was introduced to the religious life by him or her. She rose to become the first Abbess of the monastery founded at Mortain in 1105 or 1115 by Count William of Mortain. The Rule followed by this religious house was that of St. Benedict together with a few observances drawn from the Cistercian tradition.

Because of the color of their habit the religious came to be called the “White Ladies.” After a life dedicated to prayer, mortification, and charitable works, Blessed Adeline was called to her reward in 1125. Such was her reputation for sanctity that shortly afterward she began to be honored as one of the Blessed and her remains were solemnly transferred (together with those of her brother and other religious) to Savigny.

Gemma:

Gemma Galgani was born on March 12, 1878, in a small Italian town near Lucca. At a very young age, Gemma developed a love for prayer. She made her First Communion on June 17, 1887. As a pupil at the school run by the Sisters of St. Zita, Gemma was loved by her teachers and her fellow pupils. Although quiet and reserved, she always had a smile for everyone. Although a good student, she had to quit school due to chronic ill health before completing the course of study.

Throughout her life, Gemma was to be favored with many mystical experiences and special graces. These were often misunderstood by others, causing ridicule. Gemma suffered these heartaches in reparation, remembering that Our Lord Himself had been misunderstood and ridiculed.

Gemma had an immense love for the poor, and helped them in any way she could. After her father’s death, the nineteen year old Gemma became the mother of her seven brothers and sisters. When some were old enough to share this responsibility, she lived briefly with a married aunt. At this time, two young men proposed marriage to her. Gemma however, wanted silence and retirement, and more that ever, she desired to pray and speak only to God.

Adele:

St. Adele, Widow. A daughter of King Dagobert II of Germany, St. Adele became a nun upon the death of her husband, making provisions for her son, the future father of St. Gregory of Utrecht. She founded a convent at Palatiolum near Trier and became its first Abbess, ruling with holiness, prudence, and compassion. St. Adele seems to have been among the disciples of St. Boniface, the Apostle of Germany, and a letter in his correspondence is addressed to her. After a devout life filled with good works and communion with God, she passed on to her heavenly reward in 730.

See Also: 12 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Boy

Flora:

St. Flora, Virgin, Patron of the abandoned, of converts, single laywomen, and victims of betrayal – Feast day is October 5th. Flora was born in France about the year 1309. She was a devout child and later resisted all attempts on the part of her parents to find a husband for her. In 1324, she entered the Priory of Beaulieu of the Hospitaller nuns of St. John of Jerusalem. Here she was beset with many and diverse trials, fell into a depressed state, and was made sport of by some of her religious sisters.

However, she never ceased to find favor with God and was granted many unusual and mystical favors. One year on the feast of All Saints, she fell into an ecstasy and took no nourishment until three weeks later on the feast of St. Cecelia. On another occasion, while meditating on the Holy Spirit, she was raised four feet from the ground and hung in the air in full view of many onlookers.

She also seemed to be pierced with the arms of Our Lord’s cross, causing blood to flow freely at times from her side and at others, from her mouth. Other instances of God’s favoring of his servant were also reported, concerning prophetic knowledge of matters of which she could not naturally know. Through it all, St. Floraremained humble and in complete communion with her Divine Master, rendering wise counsel to all who flocked to her because of her holiness and spiritual discernment. In 1347, she was called to her eternal reward and many miracles were worked at her tomb.

Emma:

Saint Emma, also known as Emma of Lesum, or Emma of Stiepel, lived in the city that is Bremen today. She is the first female inhabitant of the city to be known by name. Emma lived in the early 11th century, and was born into the Immedinger family. The Immedingers were Saxon nobility descended from the legendary King Widuking, who fought againt Charlemange.

Emma’s father was a count, and her brother a bishop (Meinwerk of Paderborn). She married Liudger, the son of a Saxon duke. Their marriage resulted in one child, a boy named Imad. He would become bishop of Paderborn in 1051.

Little specific information about St. Emma survives. Legend states that she had a violent temper when she was young.

Emma’s husband made a visit to Russia in 1011, fell ill and died. Following this tragedy, Emma withdrew into her faith. Her temperament became mild. She was a great benefactor of churches, establishing many small parishes. She donated to the Bremen Cathedral. Her concern for the poor was legendary.

After her death, she was buried in a tomb in Bremen Cathedral. her tomb was opened. Her body had turned to dust exception for her right hand, which she used to give gifts. Her intact hand was sent to the abbey of St. Ludger at Werden.

Hermione:

Martyr of Ephesus. She was the daughter of Philip the Deacon. Hermione is called a prophetess in the Acts of the Apostles.

Gwen:

Widowed martyr sometimes called Blanche, Wenn, or Candida. She was the daughter of a Chieftain, Brychan or Brecknock. Saxon pagans martyred Gwen at Talgrarth.

Bernadette:

St. Bernadette was born in Lourdes, France on January 7, 1844. Her parents were very poor and she was the first of nine children. She was baptized at St. Pierre’s, the local parish church, on January 9. As a toddler, Bernadette contracted cholera and suffered extreme asthma. Unfortunately, she lived the rest of her life in poor health.

On Thursday, February 11, 1858, fourteen-year-old Bernadette was sent with her younger sister and a friend to gather firewood, when a very beautiful lady appeared to her above a rose bush in a grotto called Massabielle (Tuta de Massavielha).

The woman wore blue and white and smiled at Bernadette before making the sign of the cross with a rosary of ivory and gold. Bernadette fell to her knees, took out her own rosary and began to pray. Bernadette later described the woman as “uo petito damizelo,” meaning “a small young lady. Though her sister and friend claimed they were unable to see her, Bernadette knew what she saw was real.

Three days later, Bernadette, her sister Marie, and other girls returned to the grotto, where Bernadette immediately knelt, saying she could see “aquero” again. She fell into a trance and one girl threw holy water at the niche and another threw a rock that shattered on the ground. It was then that the apparition disappeared.

Camilla:

Recluse and disciple of St. Germanus of Auxerre, at Ravenna, Italy. She was born in Civitavecchia, became St. Germanus’ disciple, and accompanied his missions to Auxerre, France. There she became a hermitess.

Sofia:

According to an Eastern allegory explaining the cult of Divine Wisdom, Faith, Hope, and Charity were the daughters of Wisdom (known as Sofia in the Roman Martyrology on September 30th), a widow in Rome. The daughters suffered martyrdom during Hadrian’s persecution of Christians: Faith, twelve, was scourged and went unharmed when boiling pitch was poured on her, was beheaded; Hope, ten, and Charity, nine, were also beheaded after emerging unscathed, from a furnace; and Wisdom died three days later while praying at their graves. Feast day – August 1st.

Oliva:

Martyr. She was supposedly executed in the last year of the reign of Emperor Hadrian.

Phoebe:

Phoebe (1st century) was a deaconess of the Church at Cenchreae, the port of Corinth. She was recommended to the Christian congregation at Rome by St. Paul, who praised her for her assistance to him and to many others. She may have brought Paul’s epistle to the Romans to Rome with her. Her feast day is September 3rd.

Clare:

St. Clare of Assisi was born in Assisi on July 16, 1194, as Chiara Offreduccio, the beautiful eldest daughter of Favorino Sciffi, Count of Sasso-Rosso and his wife Ortolana. Tradition says her father was a wealthy representative of an ancient Roman family and her mother was a very devout woman belonging to the noble family of Fiumi.

As a young girl, Clare dedicated herself to prayer. At 18-years-old, she heard St. Francis of Assisi preach during a Lenten service in the church of San Giorgio and asked him to help her live according to the Gospel. On Palm Sunday in 1212, Clare left her father’s home and went to the chapel of the Porziuncula to meet with Francis. While there, Clare’s hair was cut off and she was given a plain robe and veil in exchange for her rich gown.

Clare joined the convent of the Benedictine nuns of San Paulo, near Bastia, under Francis’ orders. When her father found her and attempted to force her back into his home, she refused and professed that she would have no other husband than Jesus Christ. In order to give her the greater solitude she desired, Francis sent Clare to Sant’ Angelo in Panzo, another Benedictine nuns monastery.

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Saints details from www.catholic.org

See Also: 12 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Boy

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