12 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Boy

12 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Boy

12 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Boy

Gerard:

Saint Gerard of Clairvaux (died 1138) was the older brother of Bernard of Clairvaux. He was the son of Tescelin le Roux and Aleth de Montbard. When Bernard entered Cîteaux with a group of young relatives and friends in 1112, Gerard did not join him. Instead, he participated in the military life, but was injured during a siege of Grancy and was also imprisoned. During his imprisonment, he decided to enter the monastic life and went to Citeaux after his release.

His brother appointed him cellarer and Gerard managed the domestic affairs of abbey. He is said to have become so skillful in manual occupations that builders, smiths, shoemakers, and weavers went to him for advice and instruction. On his way to Rome in 1137 he fell ill at Viterbo. However, he recovered and returned to France but died the next year.

Alberic:

Alberic of Cîteaux, O.Cist. (died January 26, 1109), sometimes known as Aubrey of Cîteaux, was a French monk and abbot, one of the founders of the Cistercian Order. He is now honored as a saint.

Nivard:

Saint Nivard (Nivo) was bishop of Reims before 657 and until 673. He was brother-in-law of Childeric II. He restored Hautvilliers Abbey and was later buried there.

See Also: 14 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Girl

Benard:

Bernard of Clairvaux (Latin: Bernardus Claraevallensis), O.Cist (1090 – 20 August 1153) was a French abbot and the primary reformer of the Cistercian order.

After the death of his mother, Bernard sought admission into the Cistercian order. “Three years later, he was sent to found a new abbey at an isolated clearing in a glen known as the Val d’Absinthe, about 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) southeast of Bar-sur-Aube. According to tradition, Bernard founded the monastery on 25 June 1115, naming it Claire Vallée, which evolved into Clairvaux. There Bernard would preach an immediate faith, in which the intercessor was the Virgin Mary.” In the year 1128, Bernard attended the Council of Troyes, at which he traced the outlines of the Rule of the Knights Templar, which soon became the ideal of Christian nobility.

Alexander:

Elected to the papacy in 1254, Rinaldo, the count of Segni, took the name Alexander IV. A native of Anagni, he was born in 1199 and became a cardinal deacon in 1227. In 1231, he was made cardinal bishop of Ostia, and he served under Innocent IV as cardinal protector of the Franciscans. Alexander inherited Innocent’s quarrel with Manfred, the illegitimate son of Frederick II. In a struggle over the crown of Sicily, Alexander excommunicated Manfred in 1255. The two waged war for the rest of Alexander’s reign, which ended with his death in 1261. The energy and resources spent against Manfred kept Alexander from realizing his dream of crusading against the Mongols. Alexander did, however, bless the Augustinian hermits and canonize Clare of Assisi.

Aderald:

Archdeacon and confessor. Aderald was archdeacon at Troyes when he led a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He brought back a considerable number of holy relics. In order to house them, Aderald built the Benedictine Abbey of St. Sepulchre at Sambličres.

Angelo:

St. Angelo, who was one of the early members of the Carmelite Order, suffered martyrdom for the Faith at Leocata, Sicily. The story of his life, as it has come down, is not very reliable. It may be summarized as follows: His parents were Jews of Jerusalem who were converted to Christianity by a vision of our Lady. She told them that the Messiah they were awaiting had already come to pass and had redeemed His people, and she promised them two sons, who would grow up as flourishing olive trees on the heights of Carmel-the one as a patriarch and the other as a glorious martyr.

From childhood the twins displayed great mental and spiritual gifts when, at the age of eighteen, they entered the Carmelite Order, they already spoke Greek, Latin, and Hebrew. After Angelo had been a hermit on Mount Carmel for five years, Our Lordappeared to him and bade him go to Sicily, where he would have the grace to offer the sacrifice of his life. The saint immediately obeyed the call. During his journey from the East as well as after his arrival in Sicily, he converted many sinners by his teaching, no less than by his miracles. At Palermo over two hundred Jews sought Baptism as the result of his eloquence. Similar success attended his efforts in Leocata, but he aroused the fury of a man called Berengarius, whose shameless wickedness he had denounced. As he was preaching to a crowd, a band of ruffians headed by Berengarius broke through the throng and stabbed him. Mortally wounded, Angelo fell on his knees, praying for the people, but especially for his murderer.

Alto:

Hermit and missionary, recorded as an Irishmen or possibly an Anglo-Saxon. He lived near Augsburg, Germany, arriving in the region circa 743. Living in a simple hut in wild lands, Alto soon achieved a reputation for holiness and austerity. Word of his good works reached King Pepin, who gave him a parcel of land near Altmunster, in modern Friesling Diocese in Bavaria. Alto cleared the land and founded an abbey. St. Boniface came in 750 to dedicate the abbey church. The monastery was ravaged by the Huns but was restored in 1000 and made a Benedictine house.The Brigittines took it over in the fifteenth century.

Amarand:

Bishop and Benedictine abbot. Amarand was the abbot of Moissac Monastery until becoming the bishop of Albi, in France, about 700.

Walter:

Augustinian abbot of L’Esterp in the region of Limousin, France. He was born to a noble family in Conflans Castle in Aquitaine, and studied under the Augustinians at Dorat, where he entered a monastery. Then when he returned to Conflans Castle, he was elected the abbot of L’Esterp. He held the post for thirty-eight years and was famed as a confessor.

Harvey:

St. Harvey was blind, but became abbot of Plouvien; later he transferred his community to Lanhourneau, where he passed the rest of his days and was famous for miracles. Sixth Century. His feastday is June 17th.

Hermes:

Martyr with companions in Rome, who suffered at the hands of a judge named Aurelian. They are mentioned in the Acts of Pope St. Alexander I . Their cult was confined to local calendars in 1969.

 

See Also: 14 Beautiful Saint Names For Your Baby Girl

Comments are closed.
%d bloggers like this: